Rudy Gonzales

Jardines del Colibrí Dorado

Located just a stone’s throw away from the Mayan town of Sisbichen, El Jardines del Colibrí Dorado is a non-profit destination ranch dedicated to the cultivation of self-sustainable living & the care of animal wildlife. Sanará's Creative & Health team took to the roads of Coba to delve into the highly respected ancient Mayan teachings of Abuelo Antonio Oxté León.

Upon arrival our hearts melted immediately as a peep of chicks freely greeted us with opened wings and selfless love. It was clear in this moment that we had arrived to a special place, a sanctuary for many living things. The whole-hearted Abuelo Antonio greeted each of us with a warm hug and and a cheeky smile.  

We quickly set off for our adventure, smartly accessorized with notebooks, and cameras ready. The beautiful garden illuminated with color and heaps of greenery. Wildly sprouting flowers blossomed, while vinery spiraled throughout and on top of trees. Cows mooed, dogs barked, and a stunningly beautiful mother deer protected her fawn the way god and nature had intended. Two very large Cenote sink-holes offered a look inside the busy traffic of a typical day in nature’s life. While Abuelo Antonio carefully explained each of the plants and their various uses.

Commonly referred to in Mexico as the Consuelda plant, a beautiful herb that is used to aid in healing broken bones, bruises and warts is both beautiful and medicinal. The very popular Ruda-plants are utilized to warn off insects. While ubiquitous plants such as yucca, vanilla vines, and cotton bushes stood tall and grand. The Garden housed several breathtaking yet life giving organisms. However there was a larger lesson to be learned.

It is a place like El Jardines del Colibrî Dorado, that one should acknowledge our Mother Earth and all it’s beauty. More importantly the need to care and nurture our planet for a better way of living. Since 2005, Don Abuelo Antonio began building upon his vision of a biodiversity garden, respecting native flora and fauna; beautifying with flowers fruits and curative plants. Inviting people from all walks of life to heal and be a part of his. Restoring and caring for the local Mayan and Mexican community.  It is with large hearts that we thank Abuelo Antonio and all of the beautiful souls of El Jardines del Colibri for doing what they do and so well.

Insider Note: The special dish of Quinoa-Mole served with roasted tomatoes & courgette, alongside a delicious salad covered in ginger and tahini dressing was handsomely prepared by Sanara's very own talented Eric Fischer and needless to say can not go unmentioned. Take a look in the images below. 

Celebrating National Children's Day with International Tulum School

Established in 2012, Tulum International School was introduced with one compassionate intention in mind, to inspire today’s youth.

Introducing a curriculum unique to its birth place, the school’s academic philosophy of global awareness and care for our planet has transcended the local educational system of Tulum. It is today on Mexico’s National Children’s Day that we recognize the students of Tulum International School and more so, the thousands of little hearts that inspire and fill our lives with love that is our future.

Opening with just three attendees, the teeny tiny private school has quickly grown into a program of thirty plus students and continues to thrive. Founded by Valeria Payton and with support from Sanara’s visionaries Daniella Hunter and Charlie Stuart Gay the Tulum International School has provided students with the tools needed to progress within their passions and ultimately strengthen the students’ skills and talent. Passion and inquiry-based learning form the basis of the curriculum, with a foundational support taken from the California Standards of education.  Previous units of inquiry include: Mayan permaculture, Legends & Mythology, the Underwater World, and Influential Historical Figures study.

Sanara Tulum supports a Mayan scholarship program within the school, helped by sales of our locally-produced Dreamcatchers, and we hope to increase this fund significantly over the next year, to be able to offer three places for local Mayan families.

With the days numbered until summer, Tulum International School has already begun preparation for the upcoming school year. With 15 enrollments being presented to new families, and a search underway for a new location. The school plans to expand the student base, and offer improved facilities.

It is with large hearts the Sanara Tulum family kindly asks your donation of used or new scholastic books. Whether visiting Sanara Tulum, or simply wanting to make a difference. Please email pr@sanararesorts.com for further information.

 

Sanara Dream Catchers

Away from the sandy shores of the Caribbean and nestled deep within the roads leading to the Mayan ruins of Coba lies a small village. It is here that local resident artisan Javier Balam recently met with Sanara’s Rudy Gonzales to delve into his one of kind, hand crafted dream catchers specially made for Sanara.  

Designed to protect, the dream catchers originated as a guard to keep dark thoughts away from you as you slept. The traditional dream catcher was intended to protect the sleeping individual from nightmares, while letting positive dreams through. The constructive dreams would slip through the hole in the center of the dream catcher, and glide down the feathers to the sleeping person below. The negative dreams would get caught within the web, and expire when the first rays of the sun struck upon them. The hand woven goods were first represented in an all black weave and placed over loved ones heads while sleeping, to warn off evil spirits and dark energy.

The Mayans believe that the night air is filled with dreams both good and bad. The dream catcher when hung over or near your bed swinging freely in the air, catches the dreams as they flow by. The good dreams know how to pass through the dream catcher, slipping through the outer holes and slide down the soft feathers so gently that many times the sleeper does not know that he/she is dreaming. The bad dreams not knowing ‘the way’ get tangled within the dream catcher and perish with the first light of the new day.

Constructed of a locally grown Beahuco tree wood, each dream catcher is carefully hand woven with nylon thread, and can take up to a day and a half to complete. Adorned with beautiful Sweet Water Shells, the dream catchers also features Mountain Turkey feathers that are collected from a bird reserve located within the Yucatan. Javier assures us and explains passionately that the birds are well kept and shed their feathers naturally.

Producing approximately over 3,000  dream catchers a year, Javier takes great pride in his trade and has since passed on the unique craft onto his son and nephews.  Available in the signature colors of Sanara (navy, natural, & white) to place your order please email info@sanaratulum.com

 


Experience Muyil

Located just 30 minutes away from the sanctity of Sanara, the ancient Mayan ruins of Muyil are conveniently positioned just steps away from the main highway heading towards Chetumal, approximately 15 KM south of Tulum. These ruins offer a tranquility that cannot be found in the often overcrowded ruins of Tulum and Coba.

Discovered between 1987 and 1992 by Walter R.T. Witschey and Elia del Carmen Trejo. The site was originally occupied in 500 b.c and are also as “Chunyaxhe” which means “wide ceiba trunk” in Mayan. This is a reference to the sacred Maya trees, the Ceiba, which is representative as the tree of life in Mayan culture.

The ruins are carefully conserved, while large trees naturally sprout on top of the Mayan architecture. Towards the rear of the site´s mai attraction, El Castillo, their is a wooded walkway that weaves its way through the Si’an Ka’an Biosphere and to the lagoon. The well kept wooded pathway is led by natural growing vines, and various exotic trees. Nestled deep in the pathway, the site features a storybook-like walk up offering a majestic view of the surrounding jungle. It is the the perfect place for a secluded picnic overlooking the beautiful water and landscape. 

Full Moon Yoga

It was a night of celebration, as Sanara Tulum held it’s seasonal Full Moon Yoga & Mayan Ritual program. Located inside the hotel’s sky lit studio, the event took place February 3rd, 2015 on top of the white coveted beaches of the Rivera Maya. 

Curated by renowned instructors Alessandra Montana & Luna Limon, the intimate study delves into yoga, meditation, and traditional Mayan practice. In paying homage to the ancestral ritual, guests are presented with a lovely alter comprised of various seeds and floral offerings for the full moon.  

Summoning what the Mayan’s refer to as the ‘Vision of The Universe’, the class begins with a light meditation. The rooms energy is carefully cleansed with an incense copal cup, while the drumming of the Temazcal drum pulsates throughout the background. Calling upon the five elements of earth, air, fire, water, and ether in an effort to manifest the moons energy, the Yoga practice begins. 

Light stretching and breathing exercises are skillfully guided by both Alessandra and Luna. The group is then coupled off, instructed to practice together, ultimately unveiling a palpable energy amongst one another. Finally, the group is formed into a circle with the pressing of hands, and the divinity of energy is conceived. 

Overlooking the Caribbean sea, the full moon rises. Alessandra lightly touches upon crystal singing bowls ending the course in a final traditional Mayan chant, accepting the new moon into our hearts, mind, and spirit.  

The next Sanara Full Moon Yoga & Mayan Course is scheduled to commence March, 5th 2015. Shh! It’s a secret… guest are allowed to bring personal items onto the alter in order to ultimately capture the moons sacred energy for themselves. Don’t forget to bring yours, I recommend  ( a ring, bracelet, or a journal page).