Coba

Jardines del Colibrí Dorado

Located just a stone’s throw away from the Mayan town of Sisbichen, El Jardines del Colibrí Dorado is a non-profit destination ranch dedicated to the cultivation of self-sustainable living & the care of animal wildlife. Sanará's Creative & Health team took to the roads of Coba to delve into the highly respected ancient Mayan teachings of Abuelo Antonio Oxté León.

Upon arrival our hearts melted immediately as a peep of chicks freely greeted us with opened wings and selfless love. It was clear in this moment that we had arrived to a special place, a sanctuary for many living things. The whole-hearted Abuelo Antonio greeted each of us with a warm hug and and a cheeky smile.  

We quickly set off for our adventure, smartly accessorized with notebooks, and cameras ready. The beautiful garden illuminated with color and heaps of greenery. Wildly sprouting flowers blossomed, while vinery spiraled throughout and on top of trees. Cows mooed, dogs barked, and a stunningly beautiful mother deer protected her fawn the way god and nature had intended. Two very large Cenote sink-holes offered a look inside the busy traffic of a typical day in nature’s life. While Abuelo Antonio carefully explained each of the plants and their various uses.

Commonly referred to in Mexico as the Consuelda plant, a beautiful herb that is used to aid in healing broken bones, bruises and warts is both beautiful and medicinal. The very popular Ruda-plants are utilized to warn off insects. While ubiquitous plants such as yucca, vanilla vines, and cotton bushes stood tall and grand. The Garden housed several breathtaking yet life giving organisms. However there was a larger lesson to be learned.

It is a place like El Jardines del Colibrî Dorado, that one should acknowledge our Mother Earth and all it’s beauty. More importantly the need to care and nurture our planet for a better way of living. Since 2005, Don Abuelo Antonio began building upon his vision of a biodiversity garden, respecting native flora and fauna; beautifying with flowers fruits and curative plants. Inviting people from all walks of life to heal and be a part of his. Restoring and caring for the local Mayan and Mexican community.  It is with large hearts that we thank Abuelo Antonio and all of the beautiful souls of El Jardines del Colibri for doing what they do and so well.

Insider Note: The special dish of Quinoa-Mole served with roasted tomatoes & courgette, alongside a delicious salad covered in ginger and tahini dressing was handsomely prepared by Sanara's very own talented Eric Fischer and needless to say can not go unmentioned. Take a look in the images below. 

Sanara Dream Catchers

Away from the sandy shores of the Caribbean and nestled deep within the roads leading to the Mayan ruins of Coba lies a small village. It is here that local resident artisan Javier Balam recently met with Sanara’s Rudy Gonzales to delve into his one of kind, hand crafted dream catchers specially made for Sanara.  

Designed to protect, the dream catchers originated as a guard to keep dark thoughts away from you as you slept. The traditional dream catcher was intended to protect the sleeping individual from nightmares, while letting positive dreams through. The constructive dreams would slip through the hole in the center of the dream catcher, and glide down the feathers to the sleeping person below. The negative dreams would get caught within the web, and expire when the first rays of the sun struck upon them. The hand woven goods were first represented in an all black weave and placed over loved ones heads while sleeping, to warn off evil spirits and dark energy.

The Mayans believe that the night air is filled with dreams both good and bad. The dream catcher when hung over or near your bed swinging freely in the air, catches the dreams as they flow by. The good dreams know how to pass through the dream catcher, slipping through the outer holes and slide down the soft feathers so gently that many times the sleeper does not know that he/she is dreaming. The bad dreams not knowing ‘the way’ get tangled within the dream catcher and perish with the first light of the new day.

Constructed of a locally grown Beahuco tree wood, each dream catcher is carefully hand woven with nylon thread, and can take up to a day and a half to complete. Adorned with beautiful Sweet Water Shells, the dream catchers also features Mountain Turkey feathers that are collected from a bird reserve located within the Yucatan. Javier assures us and explains passionately that the birds are well kept and shed their feathers naturally.

Producing approximately over 3,000  dream catchers a year, Javier takes great pride in his trade and has since passed on the unique craft onto his son and nephews.  Available in the signature colors of Sanara (navy, natural, & white) to place your order please email info@sanaratulum.com